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SHE BOP-A-LULA: women in music 25 years on

Saturday 7th November, 2.15pm GMT

To celebrate publication of the Silver Jubilee edition of She Bop: the Definitive History of Women in Popular Music, the author Lucy O’Brien is hosting a conversation with Gina Birch (singer/guitarist, The Raincoats), Rhoda Dakar (Bodysnatchers/The Specials) and Polly Popinjay (The Popinjays and co-founder of blog PunkGirlDiaries).

She Bop was first published in 1995, and since then there has been #MeToo, #TIME’S UP and a digital landscape that has transformed the music industry. This panel will be telling their stories, reflecting on what female artists have achieved, and what still needs to be done.

Lucy O’Brien is a writer/academic and broadcaster. She has co-authored It Takes Blood And Guts with Skin, the lead singer of Skunk Anansie, and a special Silver Jubilee edition of her book She Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Popular Music is out early November. She is author of Dusty: The Classic Biography, now in its 3rd edition), Annie Lennox, and Madonna: Like An Icon (translated into 13 languages). She has contributed to Q, Mojo, The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Quietus, and numerous anthologies such as Mute Records: Artists, Business, History (2018) and Voicing Girlhood in Popular Music: Performance, Authority, Authenticity (2016). She played in all-girl band The Catholic Girls, and is working on a memoir about punk and feminism.

Gina Birch is a founder member of The Raincoats, who formed in 1977 and recorded four post punk and experimental albums. She also worked with avant-rockers Red Crayola for many years, had a solo project called The Hangovers with many different exciting musicians, formed a pop band Dorothy with Vicky Aspinall, and toured with Michael Clark in Big Bottom. She is part of eco electro trio The Gluts, and has directed music videos for The Libertines, New Order, The Raincoats, Palma Violets, Beth Orton, and many more. She co-directed the film Stories from the She Punks, with Helen Reddington. Currently she paints most days in her studio, and is working with Youth on a new record to be released on an exciting label.

Rhoda Dakar began her career as lead vocalist with all female 2Tone band, The Bodysnatchers. She also recorded with both The Specials and Madness. A respected DJ, Rhoda toured last year in Mexico, USA, Europe and the UK. Her last ‘singing’ gigs this year were in Australia.

A recent colab with the Dub Pistols, Stand Together, with a US civil rights themed video, was coincidentally released in June at the height of the Black Lives Matter worldwide protests. Bagging her first sync, Welcome To My Themepark appears on the closing titles of award winning short, Goodnight London, currently available on Amazon Prime.

Rhoda has a radio show, Pork Pie & Mash Up, broadcast on Totally Wired Radio first Monday of the month. Whilst her most recent sleevenotes were for Trojan Records’ release, Love Is All I Bring.

Still a campaigner and local activist, she is variously a patron, an ambassador, a Chair and an NHS governor.

Polly Hancock was active in the London Indie scene since 1987 when she worked alongside Jon ‘Fat’ Beast at his HYPE clubnights at the Bull & Gate in Kentish Town, before booking early shows by artists including PJ Harvey, Blur, and Kingmaker. As the guitar half of the Popinjays, she co-wrote and recorded three albums with One Little Independent in the early 1990s, and after an unexpected US college radio hit in 1992, signed to Epic records for their third and final LP.

She then moved to the Mean Fiddler in Harlesden for seven years, and since 2001 has worked as a photojournalist. In 2015 the Popinjays played their first show in 21 years, and have continued right up to the night they played the 100 Club on March 14th 2020.

She is co-founder of the blog site and zine punkgirldiaries.com with Ruth from PO! Which now takes up most of her time.

Art and Entrepreneurship in a Time of Crisis – the story of a journey with MARTIN ATKINS

Sunday 8th November, 8.15pm

This is the story of a journey – art and entrepreneurship in a time of crisis is the story of a punk rock DIY pioneer and his reaction to the onset of the crisis, the lockdown, and his efforts along with his team to make some kind of positive difference for others and the unexpected momentum and then fire that these actions created.

From the printing of a simple coffee bag then culminating into a live stream concert in conjunction with over 50 venues and the new ticketing platform Noonchorus directly generating money to venues, make a difference, and show some hope. You can find Martin’s 3rd book, Band:Smart, for free at martinatkins.com and get a jump start on looking at some of the marketing strategies utilized!

 

Martin Atkins is the definition of entrepreneurial activity in cultural arts endeavors, his 35+ years in the music business spans across genres and borders and industries. He was a member of Public Image Ltd and Killing Joke. He founded industrial supergroup Pigface, The Damage Manual, and Murder Inc., and has contributed to Nine Inch Nails (for which he has a Grammy) and Ministry. He is the owner of Invisible Records and Mattress Factory Recording Studios (est. 1988). He is the author of Tour:Smart, Welcome To The Music Business….You’re F*cked!” Band:Smart, and is the new Music Industries Coordinator at Millikin University in Decatur Illinois. Martin is a producer, drummer, documentary filmmaker, DJ, and father of four. Whatever the future of entrepreneurial music business education is, you can pretty much bet that he’ll be in the middle of it.

Martin’s photo credit: Kara Hammond & NARAS

Believe in Magic: Heavenly Recordings, the first 30 years. Robin Turner in conversation with John Robb

Sunday 8th November, 12.15pm

Join Robin Turner for this very special in conversation with Louder’s John Robb.

Robin is the author of Believe in Magic – a book about the first thirty years of Heavenly Recordings. Robin worked at Heavenly between 1994 and 2010 as a press officer for acts on the label and off (Underworld, the Chemical Brothers, Primal Scream) and as A&R for The Vines in the early ’00s. He is a partner in the Heavenly affiliated bar The Social.
Outside of Heavenly world, Robin is co-author of two books about Britain’s pubs (the Rough Pub Guide and Looking for the Moon Under Water: The Search for the Perfect Pub) and is one of the founders of the nature and culture website Caught by the River. He is an independent music PR, currently working for artists such as Underworld, The Chemical Brothers, Steven Wilson and Courteeners.

What a treat we have in store for sure!

Kim Hawes has worked in the music industry for over 30 years with some of the biggest and baddest bands there are. She blagged her way into working merchandise for Elvis Costello which led to a job merching Rush all around Europe. She spent many years sleeping underneath Lemmy from Motorhead….on a tour bus. She toured with Black Sabbath just as Ronnie James Dio entered the band and they unleashed Heaven & Hell on the world. She threw Madonna of her stage, turned Courtney Love down, had to say no to Nelson Mandela, and had to deal with the aftermath of Chumbawumba drenching the deputy Prime Minister John Prescott. Yes there are tales of Sex, Drugs & Rock’N’Roll, debauchery and fights, suitcases full of cash and Hells Angels….there might even be a TV thrown out of a window, but Kim’s story is so so much more.

DiscoTexts: Dancefloor-Driven Literature and the Rave Scene in Fiction

Sunday 8th November, 6.15pm

Almost as soon as the rave scene really took hold – during the Second Summer of Love in 1988 – it quickly appeared on the radar of journalists, filmmakers and authors, all keen to use this beat as source material for their output.

This panel focuses on the genre of Dancefloor-Driven Literature – stories born of the dancefloor – exp[loring how authors draw on the pulse of electronic music in their fiction. How do you write about something so subterranean as the nightclub scene? Write lucidly and fluidly about the rigid, metronomic beat of electronic music? What literary techniques can be deployed to accurately recount in fixed symbols the drifting, hallucinatory effects of a drug experience?

To explore these ideas, this panel has been convened to explore these ideas. Chaired by the current editor of DJmagazine, the panel features key club culture writers, as well as the author of this new Bloomsbury book that, for the first time brings these works together, arguing it is within these texts that stories of that scene are locked, told to a silent beat.

Panel Chair: Dr Simon A. Morrison is a writer and academic, currently working as Programme Leader for the Music Journalism degree at the University of Chester. Author of the book Discombobulated – a collection of Gonzo ‘Dispatches From The Wrong Side’ columns penned for DJmagazine and published in the UK and US by Headpress – Simon has reported on the music scene everywhere from Beijing to Brazil; Moscow to Marrakech. He edited Ministry of Sound’s Ibiza magazine for two years and has also produced and presented TV and radio. A screenplay Simon penned, based on a story he wrote for The Guardian, is currently with a TV production company. Dancefloor-Driven Literature: The Rave Scene in Fiction by Bloomsbury New York in May 2020. Simon has presented his research at conferences across the world, including Portugal, Holland and Australia.

Carl Loben has been a music journalist since the early ‘90s. He wrote for the weekly music paper Melody Maker for most of the 1990s, and has been on the staff at DJ Magazine for most of the past two decades. He’s currently the Editor-in-Chief at DJ Mag, the biggest electronic music title in the world.

As well as his regular titles, Carl has also written for MOJO magazine, The Guardian, Huffington Post, The Quietus, Generator and FACT, amongst others, and wrote the electronic music section of the Billboard Music Encyclopaedia in the early noughties, as well as lots of artist biogs and sleeve notes. He’s currently co-authoring a book on drum & bass music — Renegade Snares.

Carl has interviewed many significant figures in music over the years, and has also given numerous media interviews himself — from Newsround to Newsnight, and lots of points in between.

In parallel with music journalism, Carl has had a varied DJ career that has taken him to many far-flung places. He also ran a record label for ten years — Westway — and has had a bash at producing music, promoting events, managing acts, and lecturing too, plus appearing on a multitude of panels at music conferences.

Nicholas Blincoe is the author of three novels set around the Manchester club scene of the 1980s and 1990s. In recent years, he has turned to history, producing two acclaimed histories of the Middle East. He remains a committed fan of the culture and music of the UK club scene, the great incubator of new ideas, and a barometer of our national life.

Trevor Miller is a British born writer/director, author and playwright whose writing the Sunday Times called “…sharp and lacerating like a broken bottle.” His first novel, Trip City, was published by science fiction legend Brian Aldiss’ Avernus Press. More recently, Miller has lived in Los Angeles working on screenplays with a diverse roster of actors including Sylvester Stallone, Ryan O’Neal and Laurence Fishburne. December 2020 he will receive his MFA in screenwriting from the prestigious David Lynch Graduate School of Cinematic Arts. He is currently represented by the Lynn Pleshette Agency alongside Pulitzer Prize Winners Annie Proulx (Brokeback Mountain, The Shipping News) and Jane Smiley (A Thousand Acres).

Sarah Champion is an English music journalist and author. She has documented the 24 Hour Party People era and edited several collections of chemical fiction, including Disco Biscuits in 1997.

She has written about the Manchester music scene for New Musical Express, and formerly contributed a weekly column in the Manchester Evening News. At the same time, she ran her own indie record label and public relations company, and wrote And God Created Manchester, a book about Manchester’s music scene. Champion then became involved in London’s electronic music world and travelled to Berlin, Chicago, and Tokyo writing about club culture for music publications including Trance Europe ExpressMixMag and Melody Maker.

In the 1990s, Champion edited four anthologies of fiction for Sceptre and Penguin which were accompanied by CD releases and club nights. This was followed by Disco 2000 — a book about pre-millennial paranoia, Shenanigans — about Ireland after dark, and Fortune Hotel — a collection of twisted travel stories.

Kim Hawes ‘Confessions of a Female Tour Manager’

Saturday 7th November, 10.15am

Whilst KIM HAWES may have fell into the industry by accident, she was clearly a natural. She was trusted by the bands who had an inbuilt distrust of the industry. She had the ability to diffuse potentially lethal situations and had the rare ability to bridge the gap between industry and talent. Kim would never compromise. She was expected to conform to the stereotypes of the male orientated industry but refused to do so. She would do it her way, the right way.

This was a time when there were no women on the touring or live side of the industry, Kim was a first and is cited as a pioneer for women in the music industry, an accolade recognised by the University of Lancashire when they awarded Kim an Honorary Fellowship in 2019 for her services to the music industry and to tour management.

Kim recognises that with her achievements and accolades comes a responsibility to those following in her footsteps. She has undertaken a pivotal role in many young women’s journeys into music, offering guidance and much needed support.

Kim’s story is one of naivety, love, frustration, fights and sheer determination. It is one of not taking no for an answer, sticking to your principals and achieving your goals. It is one of hard work, hard partying and hard times.

Kim defies pre-conceptions, rolls her designer sleeves up and gets on with it. She reached the top of her industry whilst being a wife (twice) and a mother. This is no ordinary tale of “life on the road”

There are no books quite so raw, so honest and so loveable available and this, and the utter madness of her exploits, is what will make it sell. There is very little to compare it with as Kim was, and still is a non-compromising trailblazer.

Confessions of a Female Tour Manager is Kim’s first book but will not be her last. Kim plans to write more industry-based books on how the music industry actually works, and specifically how it works for women.

Copies of Kim’s book are available for purchase via Amazon.

Kim Hawes has worked in the music industry for over 30 years with some of the biggest and baddest bands there are. She blagged her way into working merchandise for Elvis Costello which led to a job merching Rush all around Europe. She spent many years sleeping underneath Lemmy from Motorhead….on a tour bus. She toured with Black Sabbath just as Ronnie James Dio entered the band and they unleashed Heaven & Hell on the world. She threw Madonna of her stage, turned Courtney Love down, had to say no to Nelson Mandela, and had to deal with the aftermath of Chumbawumba drenching the deputy Prime Minister John Prescott. Yes there are tales of Sex, Drugs & Rock’N’Roll, debauchery and fights, suitcases full of cash and Hells Angels….there might even be a TV thrown out of a window, but Kim’s story is so so much more.

A Sound Mind: PAUL MORLEY in conversation with John Robb

Saturday 7th November, 2.00pm

When Paul Morley set himself the task choosing the final piece of music he would ever listen to, he realised that he had stopped being surprised by modern pop music.

He found himself retreating into the sounds of artists he loved when, as an emerging music journalist in the 70s, he wrote for NME. But not wishing to give in to dreary nostalgia, endlessly circling back to the bands he wrote about in the past, he went searching for something new, rare and wondrous – and found it in classical music.

A Sound Mind is a multi-layered memoir of Morley’s shifting musical tastes, but it is also a compelling 500-year history of classical music: from Bach to Shostakovich, Brahms to Birtwistle, Mozart to Cage, travelling from eighteenth century salons to the modern age of Spotify. A soaring polemic, a grumpy reflection on modern rock, and a fan’s love note, it rejects the idea that classical music is establishment; old; a drag. Instead, the book reveals this genre to be the most exciting and varied in music.

Join Paul Morley for this most intriguing in conversation with Louder’s John Robb

Paul Morley grew up in Stockport, Cheshire, and has worked as a music journalist, pop Svengali and broadcaster. He is the author of a number of books on music – Ask: The Chatter of Pop, Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City, Joy Division: Piece by Piece and Joy Division: Fragments – as well as an acclaimed memoir of his early years, Nothing. He has written for a number of publications, including the New Statesman, the Sunday Telegraph, NME, the Observer and the Guardian.

Time Between: My Life as a Byrd, Burrito Brother, and Beyond – CHRIS HILLMAN in conversation with Barney Hoskyns

Saturday 7th November, 8.15pm

CHRIS HILLMAN is arguably the primary architect of what’s come to be known as country rock. After playing the Southern California folk and bluegrass circuit, he joined David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark and Michael Clark as an original member of The Byrds. He went on to partner with Gram Parsons to launch The Flying Burrito Brothers, recording a handful of albums that have become touchstones of rock-influenced country.

Hillman then embarked on a prolific recording career in various configurations: as a member of Stephen Stills’ Manassas; as a member of Souther-Hillman-Furay with J.D. Souther and Richie Furay of Buffalo Springfield; as a solo artist; and in a trio with his fellow former Byrds Roger McGuinn and Gene Clark.

In the 1980s, Hillman launched a successful mainstream country career when he formed The Desert Rose Band with Herb Pedersen and John Jorgenson, scoring eight Top 10 country hits. In the midst of his country success he was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. He has since released a number of solo albums with the most recent, Bidin’ My Time, produced by Tom Petty. In Time Between, Hillman takes readers behind the curtain of his quintessentially Southern Californian musical journey.

Barney Hoskyns has been a writer for almost 40 years and is the author of books such as Hotel California, Small Town Talk, Lowside of the Road and the recently-published Never Enough: A Way through Addiction (2017).

He began writing about music in 1980 for Melody Maker and then for New Musical Express and the New Statesman. He has also written on pop culture and the arts for British Vogue, The Times, The Guardian, The Independent, and The Observer. Between 1993 and 1999 Barney worked as associate editor and then U.S. correspondent of MOJO, also contributing to such American publications as Harper’s Bazaar, Interview, Spin and Rolling Stone.

His history of the L.A. music scene, Waiting for the Sun (1996) was nominated for a Ralph J. Gleason award in America.

After four years in America Barney returned to London, writing for GQ, Spin, MOJO, Uncut, The Guardian, The Independent and the Telegraph magazine. He also worked as a regular broadcaster and pundit on both radio and television, appearing on Walk On By (BBC2), Behind The Music (VH1), Classic Albums (BBC2), and many other programmes. He was the consultant on the acclaimed 2005 series Soul Deep (BBC2).

In 2000 Barney became Senior Editor at CDNOW in London, leaving a year later to co-found the online archive Rock’s Backpages with Mark Pringle and Martin Colyer. Rock’s Backpages has been acclaimed as a major archival resource by Mojo, The Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, Library Journal and many others.

How Do You Sleep? Louder’s Livestream Beatles Panel Discussion

Saturday 7th November, 18.15pm

Panel Host:

Heath Common is a songwriter, poet and performance-artist from northern England. He began his musical/spoken word career performing in New York City with his mates he had previously met in Britain: Robert Lockwood and Johnny Shines – the stepson and close friend, respectively, of the legendary blues musician Robert Johnson. He was subsequently involved with a diverse number of musicians ranging from the American guitarist John Fahey to the British indie act The Rhythm Sisters. Heath Common continues to work closely with surviving figures from the Beat Movement and is a published poet. Most recently his work features in the recently published anthology ‘Viral Verses’ (York University Press, 2020), alongside contributions from Ian McMillan, Dame Margaret Drabble, Mike Harding, Ralph McTell and Milly Johnson.

‘How Do You Sleep?’ A study of the personal and professional tensions between the four Beatles and the ways in which those same tensions impacted upon their magnificent legacy.

Panellists:

Dr. Kenneth Womack is Professor of English and Popular Music at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, NJ. He is the author or editor of more than 35 books, including Long and Winding Roads: The Evolving Artistry of the Beatles (2007), the Cambridge Companion to the Beatles (2009), The Beatles Encyclopedia: Everything Fab Four (2014), and a multivolume study devoted to the life and work of Beatles producer George Martin. The first book in the series, Maximum Volume, was published in 2017 and lauded by Kirkus Reviews as “an authoritative account of pop-music history and the man who helped shape it.” The second volume, Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin (The Later Years, 1966-2016), was published in 2018 and received a starred-review from Kirkus as well as acclaim in Forbes, Mojo and more. His book, Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles, was released in October 2019 and has received praise from The L.A. Times and Publishers Weekly amongst others. His latest book, John Lennon, 1980: The Last Days in the Life, was published in September 2020. The Music Culture writer for Salon and a guest author at Slate, Billboard, Variety, The Guardian, The Independent, NBC News, Time and USA Today, Dr. Womack delivers some 50 invited Beatles talks a year to audiences across the world.
Vikki Reilly lives in Edinburgh. She has worked in bookselling and publishing for twenty years, and is currently the Events, Marketing & Trade Liaison Manager for Publishing Scotland, Scotland’s book publishing’s trade and networking body. She was struck down by Beatlemania, thanks to her best friend’s big brother’s record collection and a C-90 cassette, when she was thirteen years old and hasn’t been the same since. As a student, she got a job in Virgin Megastore by discussing Ringo Starr’s backward fills, and – later in life – only managed the last fifteen miles of the West Highland Way by singing the Beatles back catalogue in chronological order. The Beatles 101 is her first book.Ken McNab is a lifelong Beatles fan and an awardwinning production journalist and writer. He is the author of the critically acclaimed bestseller The Beatles in Scotland (2008). His book ‘And In The End’ (2019) is the story of the last acrimonious days of the Beatles, a final chapter reconstructing for the first time the seismic events of 1969, the year that saw the band reach new highs of musical creativity and new lows of internal strife. Ken lives in Glasgow with his wife and children

STUART COSGROVE in conversation with Heath Common – Cassius X A Legend in the Making

Sunday 8th November, 10.15pm

Miami, 1963. A young boy from Louisville, Kentucky, is on the path to becoming the greatest sportsman of all time.
Cassius Clay is training in the 5th Street Gym for his heavyweight title clash against the formidable Sonny Liston. He is beginning to embrace the ideas and attitudes of Black Power, and firebrand preacher Malcolm X will soon become his spiritual adviser. Thus Cassius Clay will become ‘Cassius X’ as he awaits his induction into the Nation of Islam.
Cassius also befriends the legendary soul singer Sam Cooke, falls in love with soul singer Dee Dee Sharp and becomes a remarkable witness to the first days of soul music. As with his award-winning soul trilogy, Stuart Cosgrove’s intensive research and sweeping storytelling shines a new light on how black music lit up the sixties against a backdrop of social and political turmoil – and how Cassius Clay made his remarkable transformation into Muhammad Ali.
Stuart Cosgrove originally from Perth, was media editor with the NME and a feature writer for a range of newspapers and magazines. In 2005 he was named Broadcaster of the Year in the Glenfiddich Spirit of Scotland Awards and in 2012 he won numerous awards including a BAFTA and Royal Television Society award for Channel 4’s coverage of the London Paralympics 2012. The second book in his soul trilogy, Memphis 68, won the Penderyn Music Prize in 2018.
Heath Common is a songwriter, poet and performance-artist from northern England. He began his musical/spoken word career performing in New York City with his mates he had previously met in Britain: Robert Lockwood and Johnny Shines – the stepson and close friend, respectively, of the legendary blues musician Robert Johnson. He was subsequently involved with a diverse number of musicians ranging from the American guitarist John Fahey to the British indie act The Rhythm Sisters. Heath Common continues to work closely with surviving figures from the Beat Movement and is a published poet. Most recently his work features in the recently published anthology ‘Viral Verses’ (York University Press, 2020), alongside contributions from Ian McMillan, Dame Margaret Drabble, Mike Harding, Ralph McTell and Milly Johnson.

Document Your Culture: Emma Warren in conversation with Andrew Paine

Sunday 8th November, 12.15pm

Emma Warren has been documenting grassroots music and culture for decades.

She is the author of ‘Make Some Space: Tuning Into Total Refreshment Centre’ which she wrote and published on her own Sweet Machine imprint in 2019. ‘Make Some Space’ was listed as one of the top ten books of the year by Mojo Magazine. In the same year, her pamphlet ‘Steam Down: Or How Things Begin’ was published by Rough Trade Books and was listed as an Irish Times book of the year. In autumn 2020 ‘Document Your Culture: A Manual’ (Sweet Machine) was published as an instructional companion piece to ‘Make Some Space’, conveying how to document culture, community and space. It argues for the preservation of grassroots venues and other creative spaces and features practical guidance on how stories can support these spaces in a post-Covid world.

Emma Warren was a founding contributor to cult music magazine Jockey Slut, worked on staff at THE FACE and wrote extensively for newspapers and magazines. She is well respected for her interview skills, particularly long-form video interviews with artists including Brian Eno and Björk. Emma spent six years working as an editorial mentor at Brixton youth-run publication Live Magazine, she has made radio documentaries for the BBC, and currently presents a monthly radio show on Worldwide FM.

Emma Warren image: Theo Ndlovu

Andrew Paine is a Glasgow based musician & podcaster, currently producing ‘Obsessions’, hosted by legendary musician, pop-culture reporter and music journalist, John Robb, who speaks with cultural icons across music, art, politics, literature and film about their passions and phobias, exploring the connection between these obsessions and the work they are best known for.

In addition, Andrew hosts ‘Haus Of Paine’ for Camp Radio; a monthly radio show exploring a variety of esoteric themes as interpreted through Jazz, Prog, Post Punk and Experimental music.

Current musician duties extend to experimental excursions with Matthew Shaw as The Blue Tree, bass guitar with punk trio, The Flexibles, filth merchant with Turds of the Reformation, electronic bleeps and SW radio with The Domestiques, dark ambient beats for Grainer and psych rock guitar for Rainbow Nothing. His music has been described as:

‘of extreme use for meditation, navigation and general c*ntedness’ Julian Cope

The Blue Tree release ‘Fell’ on Glass Modern Records on October 16th.

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